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01 Present Tense: Regular -IR verbs

Posted by Señor Jordan on Feb 6, 2011 in -IR, conjugation, grammar, present, regular, verbs, year 1 |

¡Hola!  In this video lesson we’re going to be talking (finally!) about regular -IR verbs in the present tense.  We just say “regular” because all you have to worry about changing on these are the endings.  😉

It’s fairly simple.  You also might notice it’s almost exactly like regular -ER verbs when you change them.

Leave any questions, comments or suggestions below this video. 🙂

verb help:

verbs like vivir:
abrir – to open
asistir (a)– to attend
confundir – to confuse
describir – to describe
descubrir – to discover
escribir – to write
recibir -to receive
subir – to go up, to raise

Vocabulario:
sustantivos (nouns)
quién(es) – who
el alumno – student
el amigo – friend
el cumpleaños – birthday
el extranjero – abroad
el dinero – money
el gobierno – government
el libro – book
el maestro – teacher
el océano – ocean
la ayuda – help
la casa – house
la gente – people
la novia – girlfriend
la universidad – college / university
las mujeres – women
las paredes – walls
los árboles – trees
los delfines – dolphins
los hombres – men
una iglesia – a church

verbos (verbs):
hacer trampa – to cheat
+++ hacen trampa – they cheat
tener que – to have to (do something)
+++ tienen que escribir – they have to write

otro (other):
algunos / algunas – some
a menudo – often
casi – almost
de – of, from
en – in, on
ese / esa – that
feo/fea – ugly
ideal – ideal, perfect
le – to/for him/her/you (formal)
mi(s) – my
mucho – a lot
nunca – never
para – for
su(s) – his, her, your (formal), their, your (plural)
tan – so
todos – all

Related video(s):

  1. Present Tense AR verbs; yo form
  2. Present Tense AR verbs; tú form
  3. Present Tense AR verbs; él / ella / usted
  4. Present Tense AR verbs: nosotros/nosotras form
  5. Present Tense AR verbs: ellos / ellas / ustedes form
  6. Present Tense AR verbs: all forms
  7. Present Tense – Regular -ER verbs
  8. La casa + Present tense: Vivir

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6 Comments

Dennis
Feb 13, 2011 at 4:58 am

in the sentence “Guillermo le escribe mucho a su novia”, Is the word Le a direct or indirect object?


 
Min
Aug 28, 2011 at 12:00 pm

@Dennis

“Le” is an indirect object pronoun. Generally, “le” is indirect, and “lo” and “la” are direct object pronouns. Of course, each of those has a plural form as well–les, los, and las. HTH

Min


 
Liam
Sep 1, 2011 at 5:11 am

In the sentance “El maestro descubre que los estudiantes hacen trampa”

Why is ‘que’ used as that? When is ese/esa used? Would it be appropriate to use ese/esa?


 
Steven Tyler
Sep 23, 2012 at 8:35 am

Why is “la gente” (the people) not “el gente”? In a previous video you told us that if there were 25,000 women and 1 man that we would use the masculine form. It doesn’t seem reason to assume that the people are all women with no men. In another comment … someone suggested that words ending in l, o, n, e, r, s would be masculine and words ending in ad, ion or a would be feminine. Again, gente ends in e, but is not masculine? I would question that words ending in e, r, s would necessarily be masuline. Most obivious examples would be la mujer or las mujeres.

I would like to say that I have found your videos to be excellent way to learn Spanish.


 
Señor Jordan
Sep 24, 2012 at 2:38 pm

Steven Tyler,
Thank you so much for your question! The rules are frustrating because they’re always broken in languages. 🙂 Rules are more of tendencies explaining how things work. Still though… in this case, “la gente” is simply a feminine word for a mixed group of people. So if you wanted to say “attractive people” (even though men are included) the word for attractive would modify the gender of the word “gente”. So it would be “la gente atractiva”. Silly right? Another example is the “person” is always feminine in Spanish – “una persona” regardless of if you’re talking about a male or female.

I hope this doesn’t discourage you too much! 🙂

-Sr. J


 
Rory
Aug 20, 2013 at 12:05 pm

Instead of using “a menudo” could the phrase “con frecuencia” also be used interchangeably?


 

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